Let’s get this out of the way right from the start; Sarah Rodriguez, singer and keyboard player with The Hallows, sounds a bit like Kate Bush. There, I’ve said it now. I’m also going to say that she doesn’t do any of the piercing, high-register, polystyrene on a window stuff that Kate Bush inclines towards, so that’s pretty much a win-win. “Of Time and Tides” has an identity and sense of cohesion that isn’t always apparent in early albums. There’s a sense of assurance about the way the album’s produced as well; there’s nothing tentative about this album.

The songs are all strong, well-constructed and with memorable melodies, but the real selling points for the album are the varied arrangements and use of a huge dynamic range throughout. The studio versions of the songs are liberally sprinkled with fairy dust in the form of layered, multi-tracked and counterpoint vocals, strings, samples, acoustic and electric guitars, pianos and synths. Each of the songs has its own distinct character with Sarah’s bold and distinctive vocals creating a cohesive unity for the album.

As you might expect with a trio format of drums (Joe Rodriguez), Dave Pugh (bass) and Sarah Rodriguez (keys and vocals) the basslines are more than just a solid bottom end; there’s plenty of melody there as well. Who needs a lead guitar player anyway? If one song encapsulates the spirit of this album, it’s “Angel”, where strummed acoustic guitars, layered vocals and shimmering guitars give way to an absolutely monstrous bass riff as the band briefly demonstrates its heavy credentials before sliding back into ethereal mode again for the finish of the song.

And a word to the wise here. This isn’t a studio confection; the band’s more than capable of creating a huge sound when they play live and Sarah Rodriguez’s vocals sound, if anything, even better in that situation. You can hear for yourself at these gigs.

“Of Time and Tides” is released on Friday August 25th.

“Angel”? Oh, go on then: